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Google Pixel VS Google Pixel XL

Google Pixel VS Google Pixel XL

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Every year, it’s an immense joy to be able to look at the smartphone race and see how it heats up. The bigger the competition it is, the better your average smartphone will be. And there is no better news for users all around the world than the entrance of Google onto the stage. Perhaps the biggest and most important company in the world, Google is determined to leave a mark on the global tech scene.

Unlike the previously LG and Huawei produced Nexus phones, the Pixel series is governed exclusively by Google and nobody else. The series consists of two phones – the Pixel and the Pixel XL.

Aside from the obvious size difference, there is much more to these cutting-edge smartphones. Let’s dig deep into the future of device technology.

Design

This is the trait that we’ve noticed immediately. Changes have been made and they are meant to be visible. Google is sending a clear message that they have confidence in their engineers and planners, especially by discontinuing contracts with Huawei and LG.

These two companies made their phones before, with success too. Even though the Nexus series was a bang, Google intends to push all the way to the top on their own.

They made an unorthodox decision to go two-tone, with a mixture of aluminum and glass. While some don’t like this move, we’ve concluded that such a thing bring diversity to the design world. Both devices are literally the same in this department, with the same slick curves on the edges.

Display                                                 

The main difference between these two Google flagship phones is just this – the screen. The regular Pixels has a panel of 5 inches, while its bigger sibling isn’t so modest – at 5.5 inches. Although this makes the Pixel XL ideal for more graphic endeavors, it also brings forth a slight difference in resolution.

The Pixel XL is armed with a quad-HD 2,560 x 1,440 AMOLED panel and allows a burst of colors to be vibrant and active at any point during phone use. The smaller Pixel has a 1080p resolution, which is around today’s standard for all smartphones.

Performance

This is where things got interesting. We’ve been surprised by the introduction of the Snapdragon 821 processor. The Pixels series is the first time we’ve seen it in action and we can’t deny that we’ve fallen in love immediately. Its sidekick is a not-so-modest 4 GB of RAM, forming together a formidable performance boost in comparison to previous Google phones.

The Snapdragon 821 poses a significant improvement over the 820 version and it’s noticeable right away. A smoother functioning power means the Daydream VR software has firm ground to get started with a bang.

Both phones are the same in this department and both of them have one downside – a lack of microSD slots. Google has taken Apple’s lead in this, releasing both phones with storages from 32 to 128 GB.

The software is governed by the ever-vibrant Android Nougat, with some significant changes to the existing interface. The app drawer icon is gone, which is a major change.

Its replacement is a bottom swipe which lists all your apps in a blink of an eye. Split-screen is also a cool innovation, along with some added benefits from the Doze mode.

Camera

What we loved about both phones is that Google focused on camera features, not specs. Although the single rear-facing 12.3-megapixel camera isn’t a spectacular feat, the added options are a good supportive factor.

A video stabilization option comes along with a smart burst and truly unlimited cloud storage for all your photos. Although Google stated that they don’t want to rack up unnecessary megapixels, they held on well when being put against other current models.

Battery

The Pixel XL takes the win in this category, because of a 3,450 mAh battery. Although the smaller Pixel is no pushover, it falls behind because it’s lesser in size and can’t fit more than a 2,770 mAh one.

Both devices will charge exclusively through cable, without a wireless charging option. We understood this the moment we saw the metal casing. As you know, metal prevents electromagnetic fields from forming in order to charge your phone.

 

 

 

Display 5.0 inches

FHD AMOLED at 441 ppi

2.5D Corning® Gorilla® Glass 4

 

5.5 inches

QHD AMOLED at 534ppi

2.5D Corning® Gorilla® Glass 4

 

Processor Qualcomm® Snapdragon™ 821

2.15Ghz + 1.6Ghz, 64Bit Quad-Core

 

Qualcomm® Snapdragon™ 821

2.15Ghz + 1.6Ghz, 64Bit Quad-Core

 

Ram 4 GB LPDDR4 RAM 4 GB LPDDR4 RAM
Storage 32 or 128GB 32 or 128GB
Dimensions 5.6 x 2.7 x 0.2 ~ 0.3 inches

143.8 x 69.5 x 7.3 ~ 8.5 mm

 

6.0 x 2.9 x 0.2 ~ 0.3 inches

154.7 x 75.7 x 7.3 ~ 8.5 mm

 

Operating System Android 7.1 Nougat Android 7.1 Nougat
Back Camera 12.3 MP

Large 1.55μm pixels

Phase detection autofocus + laser detection autofocus

f/2.0 aperture

 

12.3 MP

Large 1.55μm pixels

Phase detection autofocus + laser detection autofocus

f/2.0 aperture

 

Front Camera 8MP

1.4µm pixels

f/2.4 aperture

Fixed focus

 

8MP

1.4µm pixels

f/2.4 aperture

Fixed focus

 

Video and Recording 1080p @ 30fps, 60fps, 120fps

720p @ 30fps, 60fps, 240fps

4K @ 30fps

 

1080p @ 30fps, 60fps, 120fps

720p @ 30fps, 60fps, 240fps

4K @ 30fps

 

Battery 2,770 mAh battery

Standby time (LTE): up to 19 days

Talk time (3g/WCDMA): Up to 26 hours

Internet use time (Wi-Fi): Up to 13 hours

Internet use time (LTE): Up to 13 hours

Video playback: Up to 13 hours

Audio playback (via headset): Up to 110 hours

Fast charging: Up to 7 hours of use from only 15 minutes of charging

 

3,450 mAh battery

Standby time (LTE): up to 23 days

Talk time (3g/WCDMA): Up to 32 hours

Internet use time (Wi-Fi): Up to 14 hours

Internet use time (LTE): Up to 14 hours

Video playback: Up to 14 hours

Audio playback (via headset): Up to 130 hours

Fast charging: Up to 7 hours of use from only 15 minutes of charging

 

Sensors Proximity / ALS

Accelerometer/Gyrometer

Magnetometer

Pixel Imprint – Back-mounted fingerprint sensor for fast unlocking

Barometer

Hall effect sensor

Android Sensor Hub

Advanced x-axis haptics for sharper/defined response

 

Proximity / ALS

Accelerometer/Gyrometer

Magnetometer

Pixel Imprint – Back-mounted fingerprint sensor for fast unlocking

Barometer

Hall effect sensor

Android Sensor Hub

Advanced x-axis haptics for sharper/defined response

 

Network GSM: Quad-band GSM

UMTS/WCDMA: B 1/2/4/5/8

CDMA: BC0/BC1/BC10

TD-SCDMA: N/A

FDD LTE: B 1/2/3/4/5/7/8/12/13/17/20/25/26/28/29/30

TDD LTE: B 41

 

GSM: Quad-band GSM

UMTS/WCDMA: B 1/2/4/5/8

CDMA: BC0/BC1/BC10

TD-SCDMA: N/A

FDD LTE: B1/2/3/4/5/7/8/12/13/17/20/25/26/28/29/30

TDD LTE: B 41

 

 

 

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